Ask the Diabetes Educator Archive

6/30/03

Q:
I am a type two diabetic for the last 13 years,diet controlled only. My A1C are from 5.2, 5.6 sometimes 6.0. However, when I clean house, or take walks my blood sugars go down. . . I can peak 2 1/2 hrs after a meal to 140, the highest and not often can be 170's or 180's. One and a half hours later I drop to 77, or 67 and sometimes have hypoglycemic symptoms even at 67.. .Is this normal? I find water and peanuts and fats tend to lower my blood sugars also.. I avoid taking walks and exercise as a result. What is the normal carbs, fats, proteins for a type two, diet control diabetic to take per day, meal? Lastly, I may be visiting some friends for six months or so in West Texas. I am concerned about dehydration and physical exercise . What do I drink to keep hydrated, since water lowers my sugars? Also what do I carry for snacks since peanuts also lower my sugars. My typical diet is vegetarian with chicken and fish, for protein. I drink decaffeinated tea. I also have lactose intolerance since my gallbladder was removed two years ago. I cannot eat cheese or dairy products. Does this have anything to do with lowering of blood sugars.

A:
My first suggestion to you is to obtain a thorough nutritional and lifestyle evaluation; there's more going on here with you than is being reported. The other piece not mentioned is how your healthcare practitioner interprets your patterns. Do you have other endocrine-related conditions that may contribute to these fluctuations? Is your thyroid reported as well within normal range? Are you on other medications that may be interacting with nutrients? Water and being hydrated is a priority goal for all of us; this is not adversely affecting your blood sugars. Peanuts can be allergenic to some people; they often contribute to elevated blood sugars if eaten out of moderation. I suggest you begin a daily log of food/exercise intake, recording all fluids and symptoms. Include time of day and blood sugars. This, plus recent lab work up would be what a nutritional consultant would want to have to best give you guidance.



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